te Ohonga Ake

te Ohonga Ake

Don’t miss your opportunity to view weaving from one of the finest family legacies in New Zealand.

Awaken the possibilities of knowledge transfer, through intergenerational application of fibre weaving arts to enhance the technical application and purpose of visual narratives.

On show in the Gavin Gifford Gallery until March 2020.

Make sure you also check out the school holiday events running in conjunction with this exhibition here.

Whatu Manawa

Whatu Manawa

Whatu Manawa

Celebrating the Weaving of Matekino Lawless

This exhibition showcases signatures works, chosen from a comprehensive collection of kete dating from the 1980s to the present, along side kakahu and whariki.

This is the frist solo presentation of weaving by renowned weaver Matekino Lawless (Tainui), who celebrated her 90th birthday in February 2018.

She has gained a number of awards including the QSM, Creative NZ: Te Waka Toi: Kingi Ihaka Art Award and most recently was made a Fellow of the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

This is the first time this exhibition has been displayed in the Waikato, and will be showcased alongside Uenuku in our Tangata Whenua Gallery.

The exhibition is only here for a limited time, don’t miss out!

Developed and toured by: Tauranga Art Gallery: http://www.artgallery.org.nz

Principal Exhibition Partner: Holland Beckett Law: http://www.hobec.co.nz

10th May – 19th October 2019

Uenuku – A Tainui Taonga at Te Awamutu Museum

Uenuku – A Tainui Taonga at Te Awamutu Museum

Uenuku stands proudly in our Tangata Whenua gallery.

This carving represents a tribal god of the Tainui people. Traditional information suggests that Uenuku was carved around 1200-1500AD and his style has a strong Eastern Polynesian influence. In his more ancient form, Uenuku is a god who appears as a rainbow. His spirit is said to have been brought to New Zealand in the Tainui waka.

Ko Uenuku: Ko te whaikairo nei te taumata atua o Uenuku te atua o ngā iwi o Tainui. E ai ki ngā kōrero o mua i whakairongia a Uenuku i ngā tau 1200-1500AD. He rite tonu te āhua o te whakairo ki ngā whakairo o Poronīhia i te rāwhiti. I tua whakarere ko te āniwaniwa te tohu o Uenuku. I whiti mai tōna wairua i runga i te waka o Tainui ā tae mai ai ki Aotearoa. He tino taonga a Uenuku ki ngā iwi o Tainui.

Uenuku is on permanent display.  Visitors are welcome to view Uenuku during our normal opening hours which are listed on our Contact page.

Images and further information about Uenuku are available at Miss Jefferson’s Curios at Te Awamutu Museum.

As an ancestral taonga, Uenuku has special significance for Maori. We ask users to treat his image with respect. Use of the image, whether photographic or graphic, will not be approved for any purpose of event other than those which are considered to be of national importance.

-Written applications for use must be submitted to the Director of Museums and Heritage, Waipa District Council.

– Permission will be sought from Te Arikinui Kiingi Tuheitia and applicants advised of the outcome.   

Collection Corner

Collection Corner

Collection Corner is designed to showcase our latest acquisitions as well as existing objects from our Museum Collection.

Case 1 is showcasing Kat Merewether’s fabulous artwork including Kuwi the Kiwi!

Case 2 is highlighting the Te Hokioi Printing Press, including pieces of type from the original press.

(You can also check out what remains of the press itself in our Pioneering Times Gallery)

Case 3 follows photography at the Te Awamutu Courier through the years.

CCorner_col logo

Wahi Akoranga – Learning Place

Wahi Akoranga – Learning Place

Come and marvel at the awe-inspiring mural created by local artist Jeremy Shirley in our re-developed space, Wahi Akoranga (Learning Place).

Explore the Curioseum, or try your hand at one of our puzzles! There are plenty of activities to keep the kids entertained.

Wahi Akoranga is open during Museum Opening Hours unless in use by an education programme.

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