Kaleidoscope of Colour 2022

Kaleidoscope of Colour 2022

A Trip to view the Van Gogh Live Exhibition

This year the artists from Enrich+ traveled up to view this amazing exhibition. It was the inspiration of their 2022 exhibition on the Front Porch Gallery at Te Awamutu Museum. We’re proud and honoured to collaborate with Enrich+ Service Facilitators to bring the amazing creative talents of their artists into the public domain.

Te Awamutu Museum has been supporting April as Autism Awareness Month by showcasing Enrich+ Artists in their own exhibition of artwork for our visitors. The exhibition is a great draw card for locals to experience the role of arts access in our community. This year, the artists adds their commentary as to where their inspiration came from and what they thought of the Van Gogh Live exhibition.

Come in and experience amazing works and words from these incredible artists.

Artwork by Kathleen Bayer

Rahapa Exhibit

Rahapa Exhibit

Rangiaowhia, a small journey east of Te Awamutu, was a thriving and productive village, until 1864. From the 1830s Māori and invited European settlers worked collaboratively to develop this into one of the regions most important agricultural areas. One of the most significant relationships that nurtured property for both Māori and settlers was between Rahapa Te Hauata and Thomas Power.

This exhibition shares personal whānau accounts about life in Rangiaowhia during 1800s up until the British Invasion into the Waikato 1864. It also highlights letters sent by Thomas Power and Rahapa to Governor Grey 1865, expressing dismay at the soldiers treatment of the locales and compensation. A powerful story which whānau members today have instilled in their memories.

The following is an extract from one of the exhibition panels about Thomas Power, set down by his son-in-law Thomas Moisley in 1938:

“In 1845 Sir George Grey sent Mr T Power to instruct the natives in agriculture and he made Rangiaowhia his headquarters. He brought down from Auckland horses, drays and ploughs, harrows and cows. The first of these any sorts of implements in the Waikato. They used to bring goods up the Waipa River as far as the pun then up the pun River as far as what was the Ford Redoubt in the later years. 

Each settlement around Rangiaowhia and Pukeatua at that time was divided by a row of peach trees to mark their boundaries. That is how Rangiaowhia got such a name for peaches which were very luxurious in those days.”

This photograph of Rahapa is a copy from an original Tin-type, also known as Ferro-type. The photograph is made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with dark lacquer or enamel – which holds the photographic emulsion. This type of photograph was popular during 1860s-1870s.

Queen Victoria Lithograph

Queen Victoria Lithograph

Portrait of The Royal Family Queen Victoria,  Prince Albert and their Five Children. Lithograph 1846

This  lithograph is an exquisite  exemplar of the reproduction of a portrait of the British imperial family. Franz Xavier Winterhalter, painter to the Royal Courts of Europe, completed this image in 1846. The Parisian lithographer, Alphonse Leon Noel, copied it on commission a year later.

Queen Victoria sits with the Royal Consort Prince Albert, surrounded by five of their nine children – on her right, Prince Alfred in white, and Edward the Prince of Wales in red, while daughters Princess Alice, and her first born, Victoria the Princess Royal, admire the infant Princess Helena. How did this remarkable picture find its way to Te Awamutu?

Come in and read all about this amazing story during the month of February, and take home some Museum merchandise based on this significant collection object.

Displayed on the Front Porch Gallery for the month of February 2022

Forged in Fire

Forged in Fire

Forged in Fire!

An exhibition encompassing images and information about the inspiring process representing the collective passion for wood-fired pottery, bringing together artists and their skills to create, maintain and fire a unique anagram kiln located in Roro-o-rangi. This amazing Japanese-style anagram kind along with trained firemasters, over 3000+ bricks and loads of wood dept at 1300 degrees Celsius for over 72 hours, creates amazing and unique artworks. Come and view some of the amazing photos taken at the firing and unloading as see some the art work up close!

The public really engaged with this small but impactful exhibition of the highly skilled process and camaraderie between the artists captured in the images projected onto the wall above some of the incredible artwork on show.

This exhibition will be showing on the Front Porch for the months of November – December 2021 and January 2022.

Rahapa Te Hauata

Rahapa Te Hauata

Front Porch Exhibition for October 2021

This exhibition developed from a huge interest from whānau members and locals wanting to hear more about this amazing story and share it with our community. On the Front Porch we show amazing accounts through letters from the Museum archives, of how Rahapa and her whānau survived the British invasion and the 1864 attack on Rangiaowhia.

Since this exhibition was showing during our lockdown in October 2021, we will show it again on the Front Porch in March 2022.

Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa!

Rahapa-Te-Hauata-FP-Exhibit
Kia Kaha te Reo Māori

Kia Kaha te Reo Māori

Celebrating Māori Language Month at the Museum!

Nau mai, hoki mai ki te whare taonga o Te Awamutu.

We have a month long exhibition celebrating te reo Māori for the month of September on the Front Porch Gallery. Ae, that’s right! Come in and see some Museum collection taonga objects with their te reo name and broaden your knowledge of te reo in the Museum environment.

Please note when visiting the Museum you may be required to wear a face covering and sign in with the contact tracing app or sign in manually then sanitise. We make it easier and safer to experience the Museum throughout the different Covid Levels.

Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa!