Ancestry Month August 2022

Ancestry Month August 2022

To support Ancestry Month August 2022, we’re showing the Queen Victoria Lithograph – a portrait of The Royal Family Queen Victoria, Price Albert and their five children. 1846.

The New Zealand Society of Genealogists Te Rangapū Kaihikohiko o Aotearoa observes Family History Month in August. If you have any interest in finding out more about researching tips, how to start, or finding specific information about your family history click the link: https://genealogy.org.nz/Family-History-Month/11216/

The history of the lithograph is an amazing story. How does a Museum in Te Awamutu hold such a significant object in its collection? Through information we know and accounts that have been verified, we now know most of its history and why it came to be here in Te Awamutu. In this exhibition we showcase four specific timeframes of events that brought this lithograph from England to Te Awamutu. If you haven’t read this story, come in today and see the real artefact today!

On display for a limited time, August 2022 for Ancestry Month.

Objects of Adornment

Objects of Adornment

An amazing display of unique jewellery-type artefacts from the Museum collection.

On show now for the month of July 2023!

Wooden Collectibles

Wooden Collectibles

Wooden Collectibles

A digital and artefact display of an amazing variety of objects from the Museum collection made specifically from wood.

What makes these objects interesting is their connection to the social history of a place and its people.

  • Who make the object and for what reason?
  • When was it made?
  • What types of tools were used to make it?

These are all the things Museum’s try to answer, however, most objects come into the Museum with virtually no information. This can be a hard place to start from, although, it doesn’t detract from the beauty or ornate nature of the objects themselves.

ANZAC 2022

ANZAC 2022

How do you commemorate ANZAC?

ANZAC is a special time of our calendar year when we remember those who fought in the World War II. Most recently, it is also a time to remember and reflect on all those who have lost their lives in wars New Zealand soldiers have participated in.

This exhibition shares how ANZAC first came about, when and who were involved. It also highlights the memorials around the Waipā district and how our local RSA supports our ANZAC commitment.

Alongside this exhibition we ran ANZAC activities for all the whānau which prompted younger visitors to ask questions about ANZAC and the meaning of the poppy. We’re honoured every year to have this exhibition as a staple on our calendar. This year we also created a virtual exhibition that we shared on our Facebook page. 

Kaleidoscope of Colour 2022

Kaleidoscope of Colour 2022

A Trip to view the Van Gogh Live Exhibition

This year the artists from Enrich+ traveled up to view this amazing exhibition. It was the inspiration of their 2022 exhibition on the Front Porch Gallery at Te Awamutu Museum. We’re proud and honoured to collaborate with Enrich+ Service Facilitators to bring the amazing creative talents of their artists into the public domain.

Te Awamutu Museum has been supporting April as Autism Awareness Month by showcasing Enrich+ Artists in their own exhibition of artwork for our visitors. The exhibition is a great draw card for locals to experience the role of arts access in our community. This year, the artists adds their commentary as to where their inspiration came from and what they thought of the Van Gogh Live exhibition.

Come in and experience amazing works and words from these incredible artists.

Artwork by Kathleen Bayer

Rahapa Exhibit

Rahapa Exhibit

Rangiaowhia, a small journey east of Te Awamutu, was a thriving and productive village, until 1864. From the 1830s Māori and invited European settlers worked collaboratively to develop this into one of the regions most important agricultural areas. One of the most significant relationships that nurtured property for both Māori and settlers was between Rahapa Te Hauata and Thomas Power.

This exhibition shares personal whānau accounts about life in Rangiaowhia during 1800s up until the British Invasion into the Waikato 1864. It also highlights letters sent by Thomas Power and Rahapa to Governor Grey 1865, expressing dismay at the soldiers treatment of the locales and compensation. A powerful story which whānau members today have instilled in their memories.

The following is an extract from one of the exhibition panels about Thomas Power, set down by his son-in-law Thomas Moisley in 1938:

“In 1845 Sir George Grey sent Mr T Power to instruct the natives in agriculture and he made Rangiaowhia his headquarters. He brought down from Auckland horses, drays and ploughs, harrows and cows. The first of these any sorts of implements in the Waikato. They used to bring goods up the Waipa River as far as the pun then up the pun River as far as what was the Ford Redoubt in the later years. 

Each settlement around Rangiaowhia and Pukeatua at that time was divided by a row of peach trees to mark their boundaries. That is how Rangiaowhia got such a name for peaches which were very luxurious in those days.”

This photograph of Rahapa is a copy from an original Tin-type, also known as Ferro-type. The photograph is made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with dark lacquer or enamel – which holds the photographic emulsion. This type of photograph was popular during 1860s-1870s.